TLA Classes

We offer online classes to help you deepen your understanding of Transformative Language Arts, explore the craft of various genres and arts related to TLA, and develop your livelihood, community work, and service related to TLA.

Designed and taught by leading teachers, transformative language artists and activists, and master facilitators (want to be one of them?), these classes offer you ample opportunities to grow your art of words, your business and service, and your conversation with your life work.

The online nature of the classes allows you to participate from anywhere in the world (provided you have internet access) at any time of the day while, and at the same time, the intimate and welcoming atmosphere of the classes helps students find community, inspiration, and greater purpose.

While each class is unique to the teacher's style, all classes include hands-on activities (writing, storytelling, theater, spoken word, visual arts, music and/or other prompts), plus great resources, readings, and guidance. We use the online educational platform, Wet Ink for our classes. Our classes generally combine a combination of in-person meetings on Zoom and asynchronous gatherings via Wet Ink:

  • Our Community Online Classes have a set period of time, ranging from four to six weeks with a small cohort of 5 to 25 people. Every Wednesday a new weekly module opens for you to engage with on your own time, with forums and opportunities to share, interact, and receive feedback from peers and the teacher. If the teacher wants to schedule a live meeting, they will coordinate directly with enrolled participants. Classes remain open and available to enrolled participants for at least a week after the class end date.

Enrollment Cost

Classes are priced by the number of weeks they run, and members get a $20 discount. Early Bird rates end two weeks before the class start date, and registration increases by $40 thereafter.

Each registration is for one participant only, and all classes, unless arrangements are approved beforehand by the teacher and the TLA Network managing director, are for people age 16 and up.

NOTE: When there is a sale, the class page only displays the non-member discounted price. If you are a member, it will show the member discount once you start the registration process.

Cancellation & Refund Policy

Cancellations: A nonrefundable fee of 10% is included in each registration. No cancellations after the class begins. In the case of extenuating circumstances, please contact us.

Low Enrollment Cancellations: Classes that do not meet a minimum enrollment may be canceled a minimum of 3 days prior to the first class meeting with full refunds for all registrants.

Incomplete: Students seeking certification in TLA Foundations who cannot complete a class due to extenuating circumstances may be granted a discounted registration on the next available offering of that class. To be eligible for the discount students must communicate their circumstance to the teacher as soon as possible.

Community Online Classes

    • 07 July 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 17 August 2021
    • (EDT)
    • Online
    • 4

    Have you ever discovered that a detail you’d once magically, unwittingly predicted in a poem suddenly became true? In this generative workshop, we’ll strive to harness that same mystical energy to write our collective future into existence— through poetry. Inspiration will be mined from movement workers, social change influencers, the inherent genius of nature’s patterns, the starfish’s regenerative limb! We’ll cast hope into the universe through ritual, spellmaking, disruption, and interactive poem-experiments— guided by a motley crew of visionary writers and thinkers. Where we are used to lamenting and pushing against the conditions of what is, participants will be encouraged, when possible, to work from an emergent lens, feeling towards what could be instead.

    This course is designed for each student to connect to their own unique social justice intention. Given that the purpose of the workshop is to help participants expand awareness beyond ego-driven concerns, locate and amplify individual sources of creativity, and sense into futures of potential, the workshop offers no prescriptive answers or solutions. Instead, participants will be offered unusual writing exercises meant to coax forward new and unexpected ideas. A series of options will be presented for each individual to select from to ignite or catalyze their own creative responses.

    A sample poem that helps illustrate the kind of possibility we are after: Field Trip to the Museum of Human History by Franny Choi imagines a world where the brutality of American policing is an ancient system of the past.

    We’ll be inspired by readings from adrienne maree brown, CA Conrad, Aja Monet, Ada Limón, Joy Harjo, June Jordan, Margaret J. Wheatley, Layli Long Soldier, Kimiko Hahn, Harryette Mullen, Daniel Borzutsky, Natalie Diaz, Jaki Shelton Green, Etheridge Knight, Audre Lorde, Maggie Smith, Matthew Olzmann, Tracy K Smith, Joshua Jennifer Espinoza, José Olivarez, Otto Scharmer, Joshua Bennett, Tom Sleigh, Lucille Clifton, F.J. Bergmann, Martin Espada, Elizabeth Alexander, Ross Gay, Aracelis Girmay, Naomi Shihab Nye, Khadijah Queen, Vievee Francis, Matthew Mendoza, Mary Oliver, Nazim Hikmet, Big Energy Poets, dg nanouk okpik, Alberto Rios and many more!

    Week by Week

    Each week we’ll engage with a series of diverse readings and thinkers, as well as multiple poems, revolving around a central theme. In response, unexpected poem-generating experiments will be engaged, as well as short and long writing prompts will be offered in service of generating new work well beyond the course conclusion. Many different entry points and options will be laid out for the participant to choose from, encouraged to work intuitively in the direction of what calls their attention, and moves their spirit. Breaking from hierarchical models of top-down power, participants will be asked at times to co-create exercises and curate readings. We’ll share encouraging feedback throughout the process—staying away from deep critique, opting instead for questions, curiosities and other methods of pushing the imagination further.

    Week 1 — Clarifying: Setting intention. Welcoming. Naming what is: what are we trying to change? / return to? / conjure? / address? / confront? / move forward?

    Week 2 — Returning: What was? Looking back to honor what we’ve lost: what’s been destroyed, taken for granted, colonized. What we miss. Taking stock, then, revising history.

    Week 3 — Reimagining: What are we allowed to be? How can we reimagine accepted norms, values, institutions, structures and relationships?

    Week 4 — Conjuring: Stretching to make the “unreal” a reality by engaging magic, ritual and fantasy to conjure a new world into existence.

    Week 5 — Offering: Looking through the lens of gratitude. Examining the present. Locating, pinpointing and amplifying the good that already exists.

    Week 6 — Preparing: Creating maps towards change: manifestos, process notes, blueprints and instructions.

    Who Should Take This Class

    This generative workshop is for writers looking to confront our broken world with a sense of possibility, to combat writer’s block, begin a new collection, try something out of the ordinary and have some fun! Please note: this experience offers a great deal of choice, and invites the writer to draw from their own interests and internal dialogues. It is not a class that can, or will, dictate how to address our world through a lens of justice, but rather asks the writer to shake open possibilities for emergent futures that can’t yet be seen. If nontraditional learning spaces are not your cup of tea, this class may not resonate. If you are easily overwhelmed by choice and a variety of stimuli, this class may not be for you. If you are open to take a nonlinear journey that requires experimentation and a suspense of typical outcomes from poetry classes, then please join us. The hope is that each participant will leave with a packet of seeds for both their own portfolio, and, if we’re lucky, a glimmer of a better future we can cull forward.

    Class Format

    This is an online class. Students should expect to spend at least 3 hours per week engaging resources and readings, trying out writing/creation prompts, and briefly responding to peers’ work from a lens of “I notice, I wonder, I wish.” Our interactions will work towards sustains a welcoming and inspiring community together.

    About the Teacher

    Caits Meissner is a DIY-spirited, poly-creative writer, artist, and cultural worker. She is the author of the illustrated hybrid poetry book, Let it Die Hungry (The Operating System, 2016), and her poems, essays, and literary comix have been  published in The Guardian, The Literary Review, Narrative, Adroit, Drunken Boat, The Rumpus, VIDA Literary Review, The Feminist Wire, The Normal School, Poetry Magazine’s Harriet blog, and The Offing, among many others. In 2010, she released the wolf & me, an album that Okayplayer named "an impressive blend of poetry, singing and stellar production that takes on a variety of complexions." Erykah Badu called her blend of poetry and music, "Fresh, honest, and loving," with "a delicate heart like mine." With an extensive history in teaching and facilitating community arts programs, Caits currently serves as Director of the Prison & Justice Writing Program at PEN America.

    What People Say About Working With Caits

    "In this age of fury and despair over our collective well-being and fate, Caits class provides poets with the tools of hope. She conjures this hope with a variety of exercises, diverse selections of contemporary poems, workable prompts, and a few pointers toward a spiritual and ecological practice. I have never taken a poetry workshop in which I was so productive. I’d call her class inspirational." — Susan Chute

    "Caits gives and gives and gives to this workshop. Our class created & practiced magic through interpersonal care and consideration for the minute. Plus it was really fun." — Parisa Yekalamlari

    The workshop was truly a magical experience for me; and I'm not just saying that, I wasn't writing for a year before the class. I wouldn't say I was stuck (maybe I was), but I wasn't really inspired and I had convinced myself that I wasn't good about writing specific topics, but the workshop showed me that yes, I can branch out; yes, I can be experimental; and yes, I can be a witness and write about what's going in the world around me. Overall, I left the workshop with a new confidence! It was such a pleasure to work with you and this amazing, life-changing class syllabus." — Erika Jeffers

    “Thank you again for such a magical and transformative workshop. Your method of teaching and approach to generation is so beautiful and effective in a way I haven’t experienced it before, and I’m so thankful for it, and you!” — Jonina Diele

    • 21 July 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 31 August 2021
    • (EDT)
    • Online
    • 3
    Register

    This thorough introduction to Transformative Language Arts (TLA) encompasses the personal and the global, the contemporary and the historic, and how TLA can be practiced through writing, storytelling, performance, song, and collaborative, expressive and integrated arts. Each week includes short readings, a lively discussion, a Zoom meeting, and invigorating writing prompts to help you articulate more of your own TLA callings.

    Every week includes opportunities to engage in TLA - whether that engagement be simply perusing a site and learning about a movement, organization, watching a video, or listening to a podcast. Weekly writing prompts give you room to work and play through what you know, are coming to know, and how this knowledge cross-pollinates with what you do and who you are.

    This class is also required for TLA Foundations Certification.

    To order a copy of The Power of Words: A TLA Reader (required text for class), please scroll down.

    Week by Week

    Week One: TLA history, fields and traditions

    An overview of theory and practice, including genres, arts and community practices, ethics, and your own values informing your TLA. Explore TLA in many forms–from poetry therapy to social change theater to healing storytelling–and share what ignites your soul and work.

    Week Two: TLA in Service: health, healing, spirituality, and personal growth.

    We’re explore how TLA can help people find their way home through health or emotional crises or wounds, spiritual callings, and many manner of personal growth. Starting with the personal, and recognizing how the personal is political, we look at ways in which TLA can foster health, healing, and homecoming, and also some of our cultural biases and blindnesses about such directions.

    Week Three: TLA as Catalyst: community, culture, history, and social change.

    We’ll look at TLA in relation to community-building, culture-shifting, history-revisioning, and social change, and particularly explore what it means and can mean to be part of various communities.

    Week Four:  TLA and Right Livelihood: Ways to Make a Living and a Life.

    What are our callings for how we make a living and how we live a life? We’ll dive into how TLA intersects with our life’s work (whether that work relates to a paycheck, volunteering, or other aspects of our life), and develop plans for where we’re led to go.

    Week Five: TLA in Action: Facilitation, Consulting, Collaboration, Coaching and More.

    Looking at the ethics of our work, art, and community involvement, we’ll discuss and write about the specific forms of TLA we do and want to do.

    Week Six: TLA and You: Plans, Visions, and Maps.

    Deepening our plans for the work, art, and community-making ahead, we’ll clarify what’s right for us to pursue next, what support and tools we need along the way, and the future envision.

    Who Should Take This Class

    This class is ideal for a wide variety of people, including professionals who want to infuse TLA into their teaching, counseling, pastoral work, arts collaboration, and community work; writers, storytellers, performers and other artists who want to develop their facilitation of writing, songwriting, expressive arts, drama therapy and community theater, collaborative arts, storytelling, and integrated arts; and perspective or current students or alumni of TLA studies.

    Format

    This is primarily an asynchronous, online class, which also includes weekly Zoom meetings. The bulks of the class work will occur via the online platform, Wet.Ink. Each week, a new class will open full of resources, reflections, discussion questions, and writing prompts. Students should expect to spend 3-5 hours per week perusing resources and readings, answering a discussion question, engaging in several writing prompts, and responding to peers’ work.

    Additionally, students are required to attend at least five out of the seven weekly Zoom meetings (see schedule below). The Zoom meetings allow us to network and connect, and for participants to learn from each other in real time discussion.

    From our interactions, we sustain a welcoming and inspiring community together.


    All Zoom classes meet on Wednesday from 3-4:30 PM, EDT.

    1. Wednesday, July 21

    2. Wednesday, July 28

    3. Wednesday, August 4 

    4. Wednesday, August 11 

    5. Wednesday, August 18 

    6. Wednesday, August 25

    7. Wednesday, September 1

    Required Text: The Power of Words: A Transformative Language Arts Reader, edited by Caryn Mirriam-Goldberg and Janet Tallman. You can purchase the text on Amazon.

    About the Teacher

    Joanna Tebbs Young, MA, MFA is author of the award-winning biography of Vermont historian, Lilian Baker Carlisle, and has both a memoir and personal essay collection in the works. She holds a BA in History from Castleton University, and an MA in Transformative Language Arts and MFA in Creative Nonfiction, both from Goddard College. 

    A writing coach since 2009, Joanna is also a facilitator for Vermont Humanities Council and teaches online for the Transformative Language Arts Network. Historical articles written during her time as columnist and feature writer for the Rutland Reader can be found here. 

    • 15 September 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 27 October 2021
    • (EDT)
    • Online
    • 8
    Register

    There’s beauty and meaning to mine from your life story, and this workshop will help you artistically express what you’ve overcome and achieved, and creatively share your experience to benefit others through the medium of theatre. You’ll learn how to write successful dramatic monologues based on your life that are personally meaningful, emotionally satisfying, and relevant and engaging for an audience. In class, through thematic writing prompts and creative exploration, you’ll develop your ordinary and extraordinary life experiences into powerful, dramatic monologues that can be performed – by you or an actor – with universal appeal. In class meetings will present elements of dramatic structure and explore the artistic qualities necessary for an effective dramatic monologue.

    We’ll explore the role of conflict, plot, communicating subtext, voice, narrative, and the importance of set-up. New writing will be generated in and out of class, shared in class and aspects of revision will be presented and practiced.

    SPECIAL FEATURE: The course will culminate in an online SHOWCASE of works in progress generated by participants, featuring readings by actors, during the TLA Network's annual Power of Words Conference, which is being held online October 28-31. Beginning and experienced writers in any genre are welcome. Returning participants are welcome as new work will be generated.

    “Memoir as Monologue taught me the power of my own story. Kelly’s guidance on creating effective drama, her concrete feedback on improving my work, the nurturing environment she created for participants and the excellent resources she brought to the table opened a whole new world for me. This was one of the most effective online classes I’ve taken.”  Diane Glass, 2016 class member.

    Read an interview here with Kelly on this dynamic class. 

    Week by Week 

    Week One: Memoir vs. Monologue: How Dramatic Writing Makes the Leap from Page to Stage

    All kinds of expressive writing, from diary/journal writing to memoir to poetry, foster healing and personal growth. Writing for the stage offers a uniquely imaginative process for healing and transformation as well. We’ll explore how writing for the stage differs from writing a memoir or personal essay. You’ll learn tools for adapting personal story for dramatic writing as a theatrical experience that engages an audience. Elements of dramatic structure will be introduced.

    Week Two: The Art of Crafting Set-Up

    We’ll explore taking a short piece of memoir and shaping it theatrically, focusing on developing an effective dramatic set-up. Crafting an effective monologue  set up involves imagination and immediacy, a distinctive voice, cohesive narrative structure, meaningful theme, and cohesive plot. We’ll explore personal themes of life choices, mistakes, roads taken and not taken, encountering internal and external obstacles, new beginnings, thresholds, rites of passage as the source for crafting dramatic monologues.

    Week Three: Conflict – Experiencing Obstacles, Crafting Resilience

    Conflict is a universal experience, a fact of life, and a necessary element of dramatic writing. How we meet it, how we shape it, how we share it is the stuff of wise living and great storytelling. We’ll experiment and explore conflict as a personal encounter and literary device and as a necessary stage of any journey toward wholeness. This session will explore how to artistically construct compelling narratives from personal conflicts, shaping the experience of resilience to involve and inspire an audience.

    Week Four: Showing Versus Telling – Voice as a Vehicle for Dramatic Action

    The memoir writer uses written description and authorial narration to illustrate setting, character, internal thoughts, external actions, feelings, motivations, needs, conflicts and consequences. The dramatic writer of monologue must craft, from the voice of a single character/speaker, compelling speech and gesture to show, rather than tell a story. We’ll explore how monologue presents a speaker’s needs, motivation and conflict in a way that involves the audience by establishing a “willing suspension of disbelief.”


    Week Five: Creative Tools for Revising & Fine-Tuning

    Focus on how the process of revision moves from page to stage - and stage back to page; additional thematic writing prompts for use with writing already generated in class; discussing strategies for going deeper; dealing with creative blocks and putting it all together – theme, arc, voice, stagecraft.


    Week Six: The Art of Collaboration – Presenting Your Monologue

    Whether or not you plan on personally performing your dramatic monologue or putting it in the hands of an actor, your writing will take on additional dimension in the journey toward sharing it with an audience. We’ll explore aspects of collaborating with a director, an actor, a designer, producer or publisher in the process of reaching an audience as well as resources for finding potential collaborators.


    Whether or not you plan on personally performing your dramatic monologue or putting it in the hands of an actor, your writing will take on additional dimension in the journey toward sharing it with an audience. We’ll explore aspects of collaborating with a director, an actor, a designer, producer or publisher in the process of reaching an audience as well as resources for finding potential collaborators.


    Who Should Take This Class

    This class is ideal for people who do word arts–writing, storytelling, spoken word, theater, and other forms of TLA–and are ready to put themselves out there more in the world and in their work. Because of the innovate exercises and engaging discussions, this class would be very appropriate for both new and seasoned word artists who want to learn more, and find greater community together.


    This is an online class with weekly assignments in Wet Ink, including three, bi-weekly, webinars on Zoom (scheduled during the first week according to best availability of participants).


    PLEASE NOTE: THERE IS AN ADDITIONAL ONLINE SHOWCASE where works in progress will be presented as readings during the Power of Words Conference. Learn more about about the conference here. (Participants of the class will attend the conference for the SHOWCASE at no charge, but may register to attend the entire conference.)


    Format

    Each week will consist of engaging content designed to spark personal reflection, discussion and dynamic writing to be shared in the group forum on Wet InkParticipants should expect to spend no more than 2 hours or so on the weekly writing prompt, revisions, reading and commenting on the work of others, viewing and participating in live discussion, and sharing works in progress live. We’ll create a safe and supportive environment, offering respectful support that inspires the development of every writer’s voice.

    About the Teacher

    Kelly DuMar, M.Ed. is a poet, playwright, and workshop leader who generates enlivening writing experiences for new and experienced writers. This is the fifth time Kelly has offered this monologue class for TLAN. Author of three poetry collections, girl in tree barkTree of the Apple, and All These Cures, Kelly is also author of Before You Forget— The Wisdom of Writing Diaries for Your Children. Kelly’s award winning plays have been produced around the US and Canada, and are published by dramatic publishers. She founded and produced the Our Voices Festival of Women Playwrights at Wellesley College for twelve years, and she is a past president of Playwright's Platform, Boston. For the past five years, Kelly has led the week-long Play Lab Intensive at the annual conference of the International Women's Writing Guild. Kelly is a certified psychodramatist, former psychotherapist, and Fellow in the American Society for Group Psychotherapy and Psychodrama. She founded Let’s Talk TLA, a bi-monthly tele-conference and poetry open mic for members of the Transformative Language Arts Association. Currently, Kelly serves on the board & faculty of The International Women’s Writing Guild. Kelly inspires readers of #NewThisDay - her daily photo-inspired blog - with her mindful reflections on a writing life. You can learn more about Kelly, at www.kellydumar.com.

    • 10 November 2021
    • (EST)
    • 22 December 2021
    • (EST)
    • Online
    • 14
    Register

    In the disability community many people prescribe to the spoon theory. This theory is a way of describing the ways a sick or disabled person has to ration out their energy in order to get through the day. 

    As a disabled person dealing with chronic pain and fatigue, I, Angie Ebba, know that many days I don’t have enough “spoons” to do the things I need or want to do. Likewise, people living with chronic illness face similar challenges.

    I have found writing to be a very healing act for me, both in allowing myself to accept the feelings I’m having, but also to give words to the things going on in my body and mind, both for myself as well as for others wondering about why or how I’m sick.

    This class investigates the healing aspects of writing for those with disability and chronic illness, and will provide participants the opportunity to write and share their own narratives. 


    Week by Week

    Week One will begin with an overview of chronic illness and disability and how creative writing can add to our personal understanding and healing.

    Week Two and Three will look at the ways that the practice of writing can help us deal with and manage illness and disability.

    Week Four will discuss ways we can use writing to broaden awareness about disability and chronic illness.

    Week Five will investigate systems of self-care and how we can integrate writing and creativity into our self-care routines.

    Week Six will look at ways we can access our creative outlets when we are out of spoons or aren’t otherwise able to do writing in the ways we would most like to.


    Who Should Take This Class

    Anyone with disability or chronic illness who is interested in exploring this more through writing, as well as those who facilitate workshops for people living with disability or chronic illness, or caregivers/medical professionals, etc. All attempts will be made to make this course as accessible as possible to those participating; if you have specific accessibility needs please contact the facilitator.


    Format

    Each week will consist of engaging content designed to spark personal reflection, discussion and dynamic writing to be shared in the group forum on Wet InkEach week will include various texts to help us explore disability and creative modalities that can help us deal with and manage chronic illness and disability, and will include discussions of the readings and our personal experiences, as well as creative writing prompts. Students should plan to spend 3-4 hours per week on the class. However, because our spoons vary day to day, the class will be formatted in a way that is flexible for working when you can and resting when you need.


    About the Teacher

    Angie Ebba is a queer, disabled poet and essayist, an educator, and a performance artist. She has taught writing workshops and performed across the United States. Angie is published in the “Queering Sexual Violence” anthology, several literary magazines, and various online health publications including Healthline and Folk. She teaches writing and mixed media in Portland, Oregon as well as online, and as also a writing coach. Angie believes strongly in the power of words to help us gain a better understanding of ourselves, to build connections and community, and to make personal and social change. You can find more about Angie at www.rebelonpage.com

Past Classes

02 June 2021 The Art of Facilitation: Facilitating for Change & Community // with Caryn Mirriam-Goldberg & Joy Roulier Sawyer
17 May 2021 Tools for Teachers: Creating a Strong TLA Course Curriculum // with Liz Burke, EdD
26 April 2021 Tools for Teachers: Marketing Your TLA Class // with Liz Burke, EdD
18 April 2021 Monologue Showcase: Voices of Change
05 April 2021 Tools for Teachers: Creating a Strong TLA Course Proposal // with Liz Burke, EdD
24 March 2021 Tools for Teachers: Creating a Strong TLA Course Curriculum // with Liz Burke, EdD
24 February 2021 Tools for Teachers: Marketing Your TLA Class // with Liz Burke, EdD
03 February 2021 Tools for Teachers: Creating a Strong TLA Course Proposal // with Liz Burke, EdD
03 February 2021 Your Memoir as Monologue: Writing Monologues for Healing and Transformation // with Kelly DuMar
09 December 2020 TLA in Action: Connection, Collaboration, & Community
05 December 2020 Fireside Tales: A Virtual Camp In // with Lyn Ford
04 December 2020 A Virtual Greenhouse: Cultivating, Nurturing, and Sustaining Creative Growth through Literary Friendship
04 November 2020 Leverage Your Expertise as a Social Arts Practice, for Community Engagement, and Radical Livelihood // with Yvette Angelique Hyater-Adams
28 October 2020 The Art of Facilitation: Roots and Blossoms of Facilitation // with Caryn Mirriam-Goldberg & Joy Roulier Sawyer
18 October 2020 Writing to this Moment: Taking Uncertainty to the Page // with Joanna Tebbs Young, MA-TLA
14 October 2020 Kissing the Muse: A Messy, Magical, Art-Making Adventure // with Robbyn Layne McGill
23 September 2020 How Pictures Heal: Expressive Writing from Personal Photos // with Kelly DuMar
05 August 2020 Pathways to Wholeness: Mindful Writing Toward Momentous Leaps of Meaning // with Marianela Medrano
24 June 2020 & They Call Us Crazy: Outsider Writing to Cross the Borders of Human Imagination // with Caits Meissner
24 June 2020 The Art of Facilitation: Facilitating for Change & Community // with Caryn Mirriam-Goldberg & Joy Roulier Sawyer
25 March 2020 Changing the World with Words: TLA Foundations // with Joanna Tebbs-Young
25 March 2020 The Elemental Journey of Purposeful Memoir // with Jennifer Browdy, PhD
15 January 2020 Your Memoir as Monologue: Writing Monologues for Healing and Transformation // with Kelly DuMar
15 January 2020 The Art of Facilitation: Roots and Blossoms of Facilitation // with Caryn Mirriam-Goldberg & Joy Roulier Sawyer
23 October 2019 15 Poets to Change Your Life & Spark Your Writing // with Caryn Mirriam-Goldberg
23 October 2019 Poems As Prayers: Writing Towards a Just World // with Caits Meissner
04 September 2019 Speaking Your Truth: Creative Writing in Political Times // with Angie Ebba
26 June 2019 15 Poets to Change Your Life & Spark Your Writing // with Caryn Mirriam-Goldberg
24 April 2019 Changing the World with Words: TLA Foundations // with Joanna Tebbs-Young
06 March 2019 Fantastic Folktales & Visionary Angles to Transform Our Stories // with Lyn Ford
16 January 2019 How Pictures Heal: Honoring Memory & Loss through Expressive Writing from Personal Photos // with Kelly DuMar
24 October 2018 Coming Home to Body, Earth, and Time: Writing From Where We Live // with Caryn Mirriam-Goldberg
24 October 2018 Leverage Your TLA Expertise for Publication, Community, Business, and Livelihood // with Yvette Hyater-Adams
05 September 2018 Cultivating Our Voices: Writing Life Stories for Change // with Dr. Liz Burke-Cravens
27 June 2018 Wound Dwelling: Writing the Survivor Body(ies) // with Jennye Patterson
27 June 2018 Changing the World with Words: TLA Foundations // with Joanna Tebbs-Young
27 June 2018 & They Call Us Crazy: Outsider Writing to Cross the Borders of Human Imagination // with Caits Meissner
16 May 2018 Values of the Future Through Transformative Language Arts // with Doug Lipman
04 April 2018 Stories with Spirit: Creativity as a Spiritual Practice // with Regi Carpenter
14 March 2018 Writing for Social Change: Redream a Just World // with Anya Achtenberg
21 February 2018 Funding Transformation: Grant Writing for Storytellers, Writers, Artists, Educators, & Activists // with Diane Silver
10 January 2018 Fantastic Folktales & Visionary Angles to Transform Our Stories // with Lyn Ford
18 October 2017 Writing Our Lives: The Poetic Self & Transformation // with Dr. Liz Burke-Cravens
18 October 2017 Changing the World with Words: TLA Foundations // with Joanna Tebbs-Young
06 September 2017 Your Memoir as Monologue: How to Create Dynamic Dramatic Monologues About Healing and Transformation for Performance // with Kelly DuMar
06 September 2017 Wound Dwelling: Writing the Survivor Body(ies) // with Jennifer Patterson
14 June 2017 The Five Senses and Four Elements: Connecting with the Body and Nature Through Poetry // with Angie River
14 June 2017 The Poetics of Witness: Writing Beyond the Self // with Caits Meissner
19 April 2017 Diving and Emerging: Finding Your Voice and Identity in Personal Stories // with Regi Carpenter
01 March 2017 Changing the World with Words: TLA Foundations // with Joanna Tebbs-Young
01 March 2017 How Pictures Heal: Honoring Memory & Loss through Expressive Writing from Personal Photos // with Kelly DuMar
11 January 2017 Values of the Future Through Transformative Language Arts // with Doug Lipman
11 January 2017 Writing from the Root & Through the Body // with Marianela Medrano
11 January 2017 Your Callings, Your Livelihood, Your Life // With Caryn Mirriam-Goldberg
26 October 2016 Leverage Your TLA Expertise for Publication, Community, Business, and Livelihood // with Yvette Angelique Hyater-Adams
26 October 2016 Not Enough Spoons: Writing About Disability & Chronic Illness // with Angie River
14 September 2016 Wound Dwelling: Writing the Survivor Body(ies) // with Jennifer Patterson
14 September 2016 Creating a Sustainable Story: Self-Care, Meaningful Work, and the Business of Creativity // with Laura Packer
29 June 2016 Coming Home to Body, Earth, and Time: Writing From Where We Live // with Caryn Mirriam-Goldberg
29 June 2016 Making the Leap into Work You Love // with Scott Youmans
18 May 2016 Saturated Selfies: Intentional and Intense Photography and Writing
18 May 2016 Changing the World with Words: TLA Foundations
28 March 2016 Gathering Courage: Still-Doing, Big Journaling, and Other (Not So Scary) Ways to Begin Accommodating the Soul
15 February 2016 Living Out Loud: Healing Through Storytelling and Writing
15 February 2016 Soulful Songwriting: How To Begin, Collaborate, And Finish Your Song
04 January 2016 The Five Senses and the Four Elements: Connecting with the Body and Nature Through Poetry
04 January 2016 Your Memoir as Monologue: How to Create Dynamic Dramatic Monologues About Healing and Transformation for Performance

"The Transformative Language Arts Network" is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization. P.O. Box 873 Lansdowne, PA 19050 USA

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